Registration Now Open for 15th Australian Cell Cycle Meeting

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Originally posted on The Australian Cell Cycle Community:

Abstract submissions and registration are now open.

Deadlines
Oral Abstract:  12th December, 2014
Poster Abstract:  16th January, 2015
Conference Attendance:  6th February, 2015

To register for the conference and submit your Abstract,
Please click here and follow the on-screen prompts.

Conference Registration Pricing
Post-Doc’s   $295
Students      $195

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15th Australian Cell Cycle Meeting – March 30th to April 1st, 2015

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Originally posted on The Australian Cell Cycle Community:

The 15th Australian Cell Cycle Meeting will be held from Monday the 30th of March to Wednesday the 1st of April, 2015 at the Powerhouse Museum, in Sydney Australia.

We are also very excited and pleased to also announce that Plenary Lectures will be given by two world class experts Prof. Andrea Musacchio and Prof. Jan Karlseder.

Registration and further information will be announced soon.

Looking forward to seeing you all in Sydney Australia for #ACCM2015.

Prof. Andrea Musacchio
Director, Department of Mechanistic Cell Biology
Max-Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology
Dortmund, Germany

Andrea Musacchio

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Cell Division Lab will be at the 2014 IABCR Conference

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Great news, Cell Division Lab and Dr Andrew Burgess will be presenting a Poster of some of our latest research at the 29th International Association for Breast Cancer Research Conference (#IABCR14). The conference will be held from the 14 – 17 September 2014 at The Novotel Sydney Manly, New South Wales, and has an amazing line up of world class speakers, is is sure to be an excellent conference.

 

IABCR14

2014 Garvan Cancer Division PhD Open Day, 10th September !

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Are you interested in Cancer Research and want to do a PhD at the Garvan?
Then come along to the open day and where you can meet with all the supervisors, discover some amazing projects, and get all the information you need to start your career in Cancer Research.

Information

  • Date: Wednesday 10th of September 2014
  • Time: 1.45-5pm
  • Venue: The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 370 Victoria St, Darlinghurst

Registration is free but limited to the first 25 registrants, and closes at 4.00 pm on Tuesday, 09th Sep 2014.

For more information and to register for the day, please visit the website [link] or contact Dr Alessandra Bray.

ImpactStory: A new way to track individual article metrics

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UPDATE: ImpactStory is not free, as I first thought, they currently have a 30 day free trail, then the cost is $45/year.

Its clear that judging a researchers output purely on the impact/quality of the journal they do/don’t publish is not always the best way to accurately judge individual achievement and output. To that end, article level metrics have recently emerged as a potential way to generate a more accurate picture of a individual researchers output.

I hadn’t really taken much notice of article metrics, however a friend at work recently told me about Impactstory, a new website that is….

an open-source, web-based tool that helps researchers explore and share the diverse impacts of all their research products—from traditional ones like journal articles, to emerging products like blog posts, datasets, and software

Its very quick and easy to signup and quickly get a snapshot of your article specific metrics. You can see my results here [link].

Interestingly, my PlosOne paper is ranked 3rd, above the 4th placed EMBO publication, which according to the traditional Impact Factor measurement would be viewed as a much, much, much better publication.

Impactstory

 

Another player in this space is ResearchGate, which has been around for much longer. It gives you a RG score, which “takes all your research and turns it into a source of reputation”.

How does the RG Score work?
Your RG Score is calculated based on how other researchers interact with your content, how often, and who they are. The higher their score, the more yours will increase.

Here is an example of what a profile looks like:

ResearchGate

 

 

Its going to be very interesting to see how these new metrics impact on the judging of individual scientists output, and if, when and which metric grant funding bodies will prefer.

Biology Journal Impact Factors for 2013

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celldivisionlab:

Great list of all the latest impact factors for the top cell biology journals

Originally posted on Science Tech Blog:

Here are the latest (2013) impact factors for the top journals in the field of biology, and cancer research. Its not a complete list but its a good start and a great way to find that perfect journal to publish your latest and greatest research in.

2013ImpactFactors

Journal 2013 5 year 2013
Nature 42.351 40.783
Cell 33.116 35.02
Science 31.477 34.463
Cancer Cell 23.893 27.238
Nat Cell Biol 20.058 21.241
Cancer Discovery 15.929 15.929
Mol Cell 14.464 15.324
Sci Transl Med 14.414 12.701
Gene Dev 12.639 12.765
Cell Res 11.981 11.078
PLOS Biology 11.771 12.807
EMBO J 10.748 10.168
Nature Commun 10.742 11.023
Dev Cell 10.366 13.012
Current Biology 9.916 10.227
PNAS 9.809 10.727
J Cell Biol 9.688 10.398
Cancer Res 9.284 8.958
Nuc Acid Res 8.808 8.378
Oncogene 8.559 7.719
eLife 8.519 8.556
J Mol Cell Biol 8.432 8.953
Cell Death Differ 8.385 8.345
EMBO Rep 7.858 7.653
BMC Biology

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We will be at the Sydney Light Optical Users Meeting on July 24th 2014

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Great news, Cell Division Lab will be at the  Sydney Light Optical Users Meeting, hosted by Dr Pamela Young at Sydney University, this Thursday (24th of July).

I will be presenting a short seminar on “Imaging and Analysing Cell Division”.

If you would like to attend please contact Pamela asap. Her details are below!

Hope to see you there !

Sydney Light Optical Users Meeting July 2014

Findings: A new, cheap, & very promising Electronic Lab Notebook

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Findings App

 

Great news, there is a new Electronic Lab Notebook (ELN) out on the market, and is originates in part from the makers of the excellent Papers App.

Its still very much beta software, but the roadmap looks promising. Based on my limited testing so far the program seems very easy to use, an not as overly complicated as some of the other ELN out there, which I have often found overkill for my personal needs, and consequently too expensive. The bit I like the most is that the software does not depend on a server, and thus if the developers go bust, you still have the software, and your ELN. Perhaps the best bit so far is the price which is only $29 AUD, very reasonable, and thankfully no ongoing yearly subscription fees.

Looking forward to trying this out more over the next 6 months.

Anti-Oxaidants and Cancer…A complicated story!

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There has been a bit of press lately suggesting that Antioxidants might actually be bad for cancer… not good as they are commonly promoted in the media.
IFLS has put together a great article on some of the reasons why antioxidants might not be such a great thing [Link].

In addition, we recently wrote a review article about how different ‘stresses’ including oxidation can affect mitosis, and cancer. We also came to a similar conclusion in our review,  that antioxidants were a complicated and not always benifical for treating cancer. One of the main reason we suggested this was due to the fact that many common antioxidants are part of the Flavonoid family. On the surface that sound great, but many Flavonoids also happen to potently inhibit cyclin dependent kinases (Cdks). Coincidentally, our other recent article in Cell Cycle, showed that partial inhibition of Cdk1 can dramatically disrupt mitosis and drive severe cytokinesis defects and polyploidy (see video below). These mitotic defects are the foundation of chromosome instability  (CIN), which is a hallmark of more aggressive cancer types, that are also resistant to most chemotherapies and treatments. In simple terms, there is a possibility that in some cases, taking large quantities of dietary Flavonoids (e.g red wine, dark chocolate etc) could drive the formation of more aggressive cancers. This is definitely an area that needs a lot more research, and as always make sure that you fully discuss any dietary and supplements with your oncologist.

 

This is what happens when a ‘fairly normal’ cancer cell is treated with low doses of a Cdk1 inhibitor.

Here is a picture of a polyploid cancer cell, which was produced by partially inhibiting Cdk1.

ImageJ=1.48f unit=micron

 

Were Presenting at “Space Oddity: A Special Science Week Event With Chris Hadfield”

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Great News…. As a part of  National Science Week here in Australia, Cell Division Lab will be co-representing the Garvan Institute at a very special event hosted by ScienceAlert  “Space Oddity: A Special Science Week Event With Chris Hadfield

Take your protein pills and put your helmet on and join astronaut Chris Hadfield in celebrating National Science Week. The former commander of the International Space Station became the coolest astronaut in the world when he recorded David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” in zero gravity. Since returning to Earth, the Canadian astronaut has inspired audiences across Europe and North America with live talks on space, science and achieving your dreams.

Now he’s heading to Australia for the first time, and in his only Sydney shows he’ll be appearing alongside social media celebrities Derek Muller (Veritasium), Dr Carin Bondar (Scientific American, Discovery) and Destin Sandlin (Smarter Every Day).

The live events will feature a blend of science talk, inspiring stories and performances. If you’re not already fascinated by science, you will be by the end of it.

There are still tickets available for the Adult show starting at 8pm. But you better be quick because the all ages show sold out in less than 10 hours.

You can buy your tickets here