cytokinesis

New Publication in Cell! The Phosphoregulation of Mitosis

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We are incredibly excited to announce that our SnapShot is out today in Cell!
This snapshot of mitosis collates hundreds of phosphorylation events and directly links them with their regulatory kinases and counterbalancing phosphatases, in both time and space, in a highly innovative ‘circtanglar’ cell layout. More importantly, the static PDF version is accompanied by an interactive website that enables users to access direct links to PubMed, UniProt, and Aquaria 3D protein structures for each and every phosphorylation event shown. The pop-up boxes also contain over 100 additional phosphorylation sites on dozens of proteins essential for mitosis. You can access the interactive web version here:  http://www.cell.com/cell/enhanced/odonoghue2
Even better news is that until August 04, 2017 the PDF version of the SnapShot is freely accessible for everyone at the following link https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1VDWh_278yyILK
A big thank-you to Jenny, Sam, Marcos and Sean for helping me put together what I hope will be an amazing resource for anyone interested in how cells divide and phosphorylation in general.

New Review Article Published!! “Mechanisms Regulating Phosphatase Specificity During Mitotic Exit”

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Great News, we have a new review article that has just been published online today in Inside the Cell!
Its Open Access, so that means its free for everyone to read!

During mitotic exit, phosphatases reverse thousands of phosphorylation events in a specific temporal order to ensure that cell division occurs correctly. This review explores how the physicochemical properties of the phosphosite and surrounding amino acids affect interactions with phosphatase/s and help determine the dephosphorylation of individual phosphorylation sites during mitotic exit.

The Full Reference and link for the Article can be found below:
Samuel Rogers, Rachael McCloy, D Neil Watkins and Andrew Burgess Mechanisms regulating phosphatase specificity and the removal of individual phosphorylation sites during mitotic exit Inside the Cell [Link]

Anti-Oxaidants and Cancer…A complicated story!

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There has been a bit of press lately suggesting that Antioxidants might actually be bad for cancer… not good as they are commonly promoted in the media.
IFLS has put together a great article on some of the reasons why antioxidants might not be such a great thing [Link].

In addition, we recently wrote a review article about how different ‘stresses’ including oxidation can affect mitosis, and cancer. We also came to a similar conclusion in our review,  that antioxidants were a complicated and not always benifical for treating cancer. One of the main reason we suggested this was due to the fact that many common antioxidants are part of the Flavonoid family. On the surface that sound great, but many Flavonoids also happen to potently inhibit cyclin dependent kinases (Cdks). Coincidentally, our other recent article in Cell Cycle, showed that partial inhibition of Cdk1 can dramatically disrupt mitosis and drive severe cytokinesis defects and polyploidy (see video below). These mitotic defects are the foundation of chromosome instability  (CIN), which is a hallmark of more aggressive cancer types, that are also resistant to most chemotherapies and treatments. In simple terms, there is a possibility that in some cases, taking large quantities of dietary Flavonoids (e.g red wine, dark chocolate etc) could drive the formation of more aggressive cancers. This is definitely an area that needs a lot more research, and as always make sure that you fully discuss any dietary and supplements with your oncologist.

 

This is what happens when a ‘fairly normal’ cancer cell is treated with low doses of a Cdk1 inhibitor.

Here is a picture of a polyploid cancer cell, which was produced by partially inhibiting Cdk1.

ImageJ=1.48f unit=micron

 

Cell Image of the Week – Mitotic Catastrophe

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Here is one of the images that we took using a Leica SP8 confocal microscope this week in the lab.
It is a 3D image of a HeLa cell that has completely stuffed up mitosis (undergone mitotic catastrophe). It has separated whole chromosomes randomly into 2 daughter cells instead of separating the two identical chromatids in two.

And here is an artistic version just for fun !

Mitotic Control Lab now has a Redbubble Store

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For a bit of fun way for us to show our research to the public, we have opened up a Redbubble store with some great Mitotic themed items inspired by the research that we do.  100% of any profits made will be used to directly fund further research (and or coffee) to keep us awake so that we can do more research. You can find a great selection of items including T-shirts, stickers and iPhone cases.

You can visit the store here [Link]

You had me at Prophase T-Shirt

3rd Cell Cycle and Cancer Conference – April 2013 Montpellier France !

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There is an excellent Conference coming up in the beautiful southern French city of Montpellier. There is an amazing line up of world class speakers, so book the dates in your calendar for 2-5th April 2013 !

Closing date for abstracts is Feb 24th 2013, with registration costing from €200-300 for students and academics.

3rd Cell Cycle and Cancer Conference France 2013